Topic

COVID-19

“COVID-19 has exposed some unpleasant truths about the nature of our society—among them, the scale of forced labour in supply chains, and the dangers of chaotic, rushed and unaccountable procurement.”Andrew Wallis, founder and CEO of anti-slavery charity Unseen.

COVID-19 Impacts on Seafood Supply Chains

COVID-19 has touched every seafood supply chain across the globe, exposing varying degrees of resilience and vulnerability. Impacts began in Asia as the virus spread, causing supply chain shortages from production pauses and price volatility in the rest of the world. Some frozen seafood found new markets in retail while fresh seafood businesses and the restaurants they depended on struggled to adapt. Shelf stable products boomed at the beginning of the pandemic but then trended lower than ever before. The totality of these impacts is yet to be seen and measured. Amidst these shifts, seafood workers were put at greater risk than ever before. Outbreaks occurred at production facilities where social distancing was impossible and personal protective equipment (PPE) was lacking. Travel bans meant distant water crews were sometimes stranded away from home or even away from land entirely for many months at a time.

Learn more about the impacts on seafood supply chains:

Social Responsibility Implications of COVID-19

Many vulnerabilities already present for seafood workers were exacerbated by COVID-19. Cramped working conditions on vessels and in processing facilities increased the risk of infection. Travel restrictions stranded migrant workers abroad or at sea and further compromised already precarious legal status and access to aid. And language barriers and racism unfairly associated migrant workers with a greater likelihood of transmission. Seafood businesses must be aware of these new challenges and ensure that their employees and supply chain partners are adjusting operations accordingly and investing in the security of their workforce.

Read about the impacts of COVID 19 on workers and areas of risk identified by leading human rights organizations: 

Actions to Protect and Support Workers Impacted by COVID-19

Understanding these implications will provide context for protecting and supporting your employees and the workers throughout your supply chain. But employers must also be well-versed in rules and regulations, safety best practices, and other necessary information for their employees to function effectively. Information about rules, regulations, and best practices must also be made available and clearly communicated to the employees themselves. Companies may learn more about COVID-19 impacts, seafood industry responses, and lessons learned from these case studies on Alaska and Thailand.

Learn more about actions companies can take to protect and support workers impacted by COVID 19:

Resource Download

Enter a few details about yourself to view this resource.
  • This information will not be shared, and is only used to communicate with and better understand our users.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Dismiss

Newsletter Sign-up

Enter a few details about yourself to view this resource.
  • This information will not be shared, and is only used to communicate with and better understand our users.

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Dismiss